At safe trick-or-treat, a young boy decides on what candy to get out of the bowel. (Annie Sichting)
At safe trick-or-treat, a young boy decides on what candy to get out of the bowel.

Annie Sichting

Students and Trick-Or-Treating

November 5, 2019

To some, trick-or-treating is for children. In movies such as Monster House, there always seems to be an ever-present worry that one is “too old” to trick-or-treat, but at what age are you supposed to stop? Believe it or not, many high school students across the country still go trick-or-treating; others may spend the night inside with family or at a Halloween party. What about MHS? Do the students here trick-or-treat?

A survey was taken to answer that exact question, and 200 people responded. The majority answer? No. 54.5% of students don’t trick-or-treat anymore, leaving a remainder of only 45.5% who still do. According to the data, trick-or-treating is dead for the majority of MHS students, so why does the minority still participate? 

Ash Olson said, “I like having free candy, but also it’s just something [that] even though I’m almost an adult, I can still be a little kid for one night. Also, I take my nephew trick-or-treating.” 

On the other hand, for Dylan Archer, the reason is pretty clear as to why she does not go anymore.  

“It just kind of stopped being fun because it was always cold out and having to wear dress-up stuff [wasn’t fun]. Dressing up in a costume is fun, but when you’re wearing it all night with make-up on your face, it’s smearing, and it’s cold/snowing [outside] it’s not as fun,” Archer said.

So, while the data does say that trick or treating is a thing of the past here at MHS, many have their own reasons for why they do or don’t trick-or-treat. 

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